What Makes A Story Disappointing

  1. Let them be the hero. It’s counterproductive. You want to swoop in and rescue people. That desire doesn't make you a bad person — as a matter of fact, it makes you a good person. But you’re not here to rescue, you’re here to train and to teach. What can you teach your customers that will help them solve their own problems?
  2. Give them a tool that works. What is the lightsaber you put in a client’s hand? What is the force-like power you teach them to use? Make sure it works. Presumably, you wouldn’t be in business if you didn’t have something useful to sell — so, maybe spend some time talking to your customers. are you actually solving a problem they have? Do you understand what they need? Selling your widget isn’t the goal — contributing to the success of their story is the goal.
  3. Stick around. This is another counter-productive one. After a lot of salespeople or business owners make the sale, they disappear. They take the money and run. But, pointing back to Star Wars, Obi-Wan never really goes away. Even after he dies. He always pops back up, at the end of a movie, all blue and glowy. If you want to ensure your customer isn’t dissatisfied with the story they entered with you, be where they can find you. Keep providing value. Keep the relationship alive and the story will continue to feel alive and vital.

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Patch Drury

Patch Drury

Patch helps people find their purpose